Continued

KE SPIRIT5

Whether your bike is vintage, modern muscle machine or anything in between, Original Bike Spirits'"

Cycle Fuel System Supreme will improve fuel efficiency and boost horsepower as you ride.

KE SPIRIT5

Whether your bike is vintage, modern muscle machine or anything in between, Original Bike Spirits'"

Cycle Fuel System Supreme will improve fuel efficiency and boost horsepower as you ride.

Get more performance and enjoyment from your bike.

To find this, and all our other industry-leading products, log on to originalbikespirits.com to find a dealer near you.

To find this, and all our other industry-leading products, log on to originalbikespirits.com to find a dealer near you.

originalbikcspirits.com

Bikes

Kawasaki ZX-6/ZZR600

Best 600cc Streetbike, 1993

Years sold: 12 (1993-2004) MSRP new: S6199 (1993) to $6499 (2004)

Blue Book retail value: $1865 (1993) to $3325 (2004)

Basic specs: A 599cc, dohc inline-Four making 88 rear-wheel horsepower that launched the 462-pound machine to an 11.19-second, 123.5-mph quarter-mile and an impressive top speed of 153 mph. Why it won: Compared to the other sporty middleweights of the era, the new-for-'93 ZX-6 was the fastest, the quickest, the roomiest, the most comfortable and the most versatile. Soon afterward, 600-class sportbikes started evolving into all-out race-bikes with lights, and in 1995, the ZX-6 was replaced by the racier ZX-6R as Kawasaki's top-line 600. The ZX-6 was kept in the lineup, however, to offer buyers a more-practical, less-expensive alternative. The ZX-6 proved popular enough to stay in the mix through the 2004 season, undergoing a name change to ZZR600 in 2003. But all along, it remained the same fast, friendly performer with capabilities ranging from full-tilt backroad blasting to everyday commuting and even, with a tankbag and maybe even a set of soft, over-the-seat saddlebags, a weekend tourer. To this day, it remains one of the best all-around motorcycles ever sold.

In 2005, Kawasaki introduced a "new" ZZR600, but it was not the same motorcycle that had been making friends since

1993; rather, the '05 ZZR600 merely was the '04 ZX-6R repli-racer, which had been superseded that year by an even lighter, faster and racier 6R. From the 1993 Ten Best story: "Kawasaki annexed prime Honda territory by squeezing huge amounts of power from a 599cc engine, by mounting that engine in a chassis that's comfortable for riders of all sizes, by equipping the chassis with premium suspension pieces that yield crisp handling and a comfortable ride, and by providing the bike with the polished detail finish that Honda buyers take for granted." Useful resources: Quite a bit of informa

tion about this model is available on the Internet, including bikes, parts and manuals up for sale. You'll find several forums devoted largely to this machine, and even a few ZX-6/ZZR clubs—although the material on ZZR sites often also deals with the ZZR1200, the enlarged and rebadged ZX-11 that Kawasaki sold for a few years. Since this very same 600 was known as the ZX-6 and the ZZR600, use both names when scouring the 'Net for information.

in one direction or another, but as soon as it starts to tilt (which changes the plane of its axis), it swivels 90 degrees in the direction of rotation. But that swiveling is another axis-changing motion that is answered 90 degrees later, as is the next, and the next, and so on. As a result, the gyroscope wobbles around in a circle on the string but never falls off until it stops spinning.

The resistance you felt when you changed the plane of the spinning bicycle wheel is what causes the wheels of a motorcycle to act as gyroscopes that give the bike much of its stability. But when the rider moves the handlebars to, say, the left, that action tries to steer the front part of the front wheel to the left. Because of precession, however, the reaction to that input takes place 90 degrees of wheel rotation later, down near the bottom of the front wheel. But the wheel is tightly clamped to the fork, and the fork is tightly attached to the frame, meaning that the wheel can't just lean on its own, independent of the rest of the motorcycle. So, as the bottom of the wheel tries to lean to the left, precession also causes the rest of the bike to want to lean to the right. Given the masses involved, this reaction is rather slight, but whether turning left or right, it works in harmony with countersteering to help the bike lean in the desired direction.

As 1 implied earlier, there's a lot

Please look out for motorcyclists.

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