Specifications

Capacity: 249.3cc

Bore and stroke: 66.4mm x 72mm

Transmission: Five-speed

Fuel tank capacity: 9.5 litres

Front suspension: Kayaba USD 48mm

(300mm travel)

Rear suspension: Sachs (320mm travel)

Front brake: 260mm disc

Rear brake: 220mm disc

Seat height: 975mm

Wheelbase: 1465mm

Ground clearance: 345mm

Kerb weight: 103kg

Capacity: 302.4cc

Bore and stroke: 82mm x 57.35mm

Transmission: Six-speed

Fuel tank capacity: 8.5 litres

Front suspension: Kayaba USD 48mm

(300mm travel)

Rear suspension: Sachs (296mm travel)

Front brake: 260mm disc

Rear brake: 240mm disc

Seat height: 950mm

Wheelbase: 1470mm

Ground clearance: 290mm

Kerb weight: 106kg

Capacity: 302.4cc

Bore and stroke: 82mm x 57.35mm

Transmission: Six-speed

Fuel tank capacity: 8.5 litres

Front suspension: Kayaba USD 48mm

(300mm travel)

Rear suspension: Sachs (296mm travel)

Front brake: 260mm disc

Rear brake: 240mm disc

Seat height: 950mm

Wheelbase: 1470mm

Ground clearance: 290mm

Kerb weight: 106kg

Wakker whips the WR250 -shame he forgot to stay on board for the conditions it was time to get serious for a few minutes and hit out two hard and consistent laps on the bikes. Sutty was the official timekeeper and the 310 was up first. I felt good on the bike and the track felt good as the conditions were a great test and challenge to bike and rider to make consistent laps for a true judgement on each. I cut a couple of the extra tight sections of track out to get a good flow on for consistency so it was off on the thumper for a hot lap.

Every inch of the lap was taken in the bike's stride and even with the rain lashing down the grip was fairly easy to find. Surely the two-stroke was going to struggle to win...

The rock section was not taken too aggressively on the 310 but a couple of dabs got us through and on our way. The bombholes were not a problem and the stream crossings were comfortable. In all, the lap on the 310 went smoothly and fairly easily.

Okay. Two-stroke time! I knew the lap on the two-stroke was going to have to be a smoothie as the conditions were getting pretty bad in the open parts of the track. I had to try to replicate the four-stroke lap but also change my style and body position slightly to find grip on the light and lively machine.

To say the two-stroke covers the ground well is an understatement but with many of the technical sections of track being tight and start/stop into rocks and roots I was worried about the two-stoke tendency to spin up and lose traction compared to the four-stroke. There was no need to worry - the Husky gently grunted up even the most slippery short climbs and tracked like a tank. I was very surprised to feel this and it was a great test of the bike with such a close back-to-back comparison with the 310. Every difference could be felt and although the bikes are completely different they both felt great on the laps and Sutty was keeping the times close to his chest while quizzing me as to how it went with each circuit.

As both laps went well without any major moments I thought the lap on the 310 felt faster as I seemed to be able to push harder on it. Sutty's smile grew as he gave me the result - a 6.08 lap on the 310 four-stroke and six minutes flat on the two-stroker! Now that was a test. I was genuinely surprised but the clock doesn't lie.

I felt faster on the four-stroke but the design and power delivery on the two-stroke while being ridden smoothly took the fastest time of the day. Great stuff and thanks to Dave the Plum and Stuart the Legend at Husky for making the effort to make the test happen.

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